1967 Jeep CJ-6

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History

The CJ-6 model was offered to appease Jeep utility owners whose only complaint about the CJ-type models was lack of storage space.

The Jeep CJ-6 features a 20-inch longer wheelbase than the CJ-5. Introduced in 1955 as a 1956 model, the CJ-6 wasn’t as popular with civilians in the United States as it was in other countries such as Sweden and South America. But, the CJ-6 Jeeps were popular with the U.S Forest Service. Around 50,172 had been made when the series went out of production completely in 1975.

The CJ-6 seen today was used for a volunteer ambulance service to transport the sick to the hospital in Troy, Michigan. The vehicle is in remarkable condition with 14,000 original miles—a truly amazing antique. It has its original tires, paint, and top.

Features

  • Original paint
  • Original tires
  • Original soft top
  • Dispatch radio, CB radio, and AM radio
  • Original PTO Ramsey winch
Manufacturer Kaiser Jeep
Production 50,172 built
Engine Options Hurricane engine, 72 hp & 114 ft./lbs. torque
Perkins diesel, 62 hp & 143 ft./lbs. torque
Dauntless V6, 160 hp & 230 ft./lbs. torque
232 cubic inch, 100 hp & 185 ft./lbs. torque
258 cubic inch, 115-150 hp & 210-240 ft./lbs. torque
304 cubic inch, 125-150 hp & 220-245 ft./lbs. torque
Transmission Options T14A, T15, T18, T90C, & T98 manual transmissions
Transfer Case Spicer 18, Dana 20
Rear Axle Spicer 44-2, Dana 44
Front Axle Spicer 25, Spicer 27, Dana 30
Wheelbase 101-inches from 1955-1971, 104-inches from 1972-1975
Length 155.5 in.
Width 71.7 in.
Height 68.4 in.
Curb Weight 2,413 lbs.

Closer Look

A Long Jeep Story
One of the perennial requests from early Jeep owners was “more room!” In the CJ line, Jeep’s first response was the CJ-6 that debuted in August of 1955 as a 1956 model. The CJ-6 was nothing more than what it took to stretch the wheelbase of the newly introduced CJ-5 from 81 to 101 inches. Those 20 inches were added between the front seats and the rear wheel well. Depending on how you looked at it, you got 20 more inches in back for gear or cargo, or 20 more inches of legroom for rear seat passengers. A little bit of sheet metal, a longer rear driveshaft, a few more feet of wire, a little more exhaust pipe… easy-peasy!

Like the CJ-5, the CJ-6 had military roots. The idea appeared first in the CJ-4MA prototype of 1951. This rig was being developed as a frontline ambulance and was an offshoot of a program to fit the CJ with the more powerful Jeep F-head engine. This development created several “missing link” prototypes that were hybrids between the flatfender and the roundfender Jeeps. The final result of these developments were the Willys MD, which the Army called the M-38A1, and the long wheelbase MDA, which was known as the M-170 frontline ambulance. The first MDs rolled off the line in April of ’52 and the MDA started production in October of ’53. Willys intended, or should we say desired, to debut both military and civilian versions of these Jeeps simultaneously. With production being diverted for the Korean War coupled with materials shortages and rationing, the civvy product went onto the back burner until the situation improved and the CJ-3B carried the F-head torch in the interim.

Production of the CJ-6 started in August of 1956 but it can’t be said there was a sales explosion. About 2,300 were sold that first year and production hovered under 2,000 units, with a few upward blips that neared 3,000 units, until ’76 when it was no longer offered for domestic sales. The CJ-7 supplanted it at that point. Production continued for export into 1981, when the CJ-8 debuted, but there are some CJ-6s thought to have been sold here from ’76-81. Were they special orders of some kind? That would take a little research to determine.

A variation of the CJ-6 was the CJ-6A Tuxedo Park Mark IV. These were dolled up “luxury” versions of the CJ-6. A comfort oriented Tuxedo Park package had debuted for ’61 but for ’64, the “Mark IV” model was created. It got an “A” designation and a bevy of parts peculiar to that special model. From ’64 to ’67, when they were discontinued, the CJ-6A had the 8422 model prefix (the standard CJ-6 had switched from a 57748 prefix to 8405 in ’64). On the technical side, the Tuxedo Park Mark IV CJ-6A had a special soft-ride suspension, with dual-rate rear springs, a column shift transmission with a single lever transfer case shifter and duo-servo brakes (non-power but required less pedal effort). The rest of the doll-up included a plush 2/3-1/3 calf-grain vinyl seat (similar quality buckets also available), an optional rear seat to match, chrome bumpers, hinges and exterior accoutrements, the turbine style wheel covers and the special “Mark IV badges. They came in only four colors, White Cap White, Sierra Blue, President Red and Parkway Green with color keyed tops to match.

An almost forgotten variation of the long wheelbase CJ is the DJ-6. When Jeep discontinued the two-wheel drive DJ-3A Dispatcher after ’64, the DJ-5 and DJ-6 models took their place. The DJs had most of the same options available as the 4×4 CJ, and even came as Tuxedo Park models, but they were built in very small numbers and are seldom seen today. Only 2,773 are known to have been produced from ’65 through ’69.

The engine options for the CJ-6 followed the CJ-5. At first, the only engine was the venerated F-134, which came in both a low compression (6.7 or 6.9:1 depending on year) or a high compression (7.1 or 7.8:1) for high altitude use. In 1961, a 192ci, 62 hp/143 lbs-ft Perkins diesel was added to the options list. When the optional 225 ci, 160 hp/230 lbs-ft V6 debuted for the ’66 model year, it was optional in all the Universal Jeeps and made a big splash. Bigger changes came for ’72, when the AMC line of engines were added to Jeeps. At that point you had a choice of the base 232ci six, the optional 258 six or a 304 cubic inch V8. This lineup remained through 1975. The export model CJ-6s built after ’75 were only available with one of the two sixes.

In March of 1967, the Spruce Tip Green CJ-6 you see here rolled off the line, was delivered to Doc’s Jeep Land in Royal Oak, Michigan, and soon went home with a funeral home owner named Bill Price. Bill also operated an ambulance service in his community and used the CJ-6 as an off-road ambulance/rescue rig when terrain or inclement weather dictated a 4×4. A Korean War Era Marine, Bill was very civically active and performed a great number of volunteer and community service jobs over his years in the Troy, Michigan, area and when he passed away in 2010, he was sorely missed.

Jeep historian Bill Norris conducted an interview of Price in 2010, not long before he passed away, and learned a few details about how the Jeep was used. When purchased in April of 1967, Price gave the Jeep unit number 53 in his ambulance fleet. It was seldom used but when it was, it was carefully washed and stored back into a heated garage. Bill reported he had the Jeep Ziebarted on his way home from the dealer after purchase. Even after it was no longer used as an ambulance, Bill used the Jeep recreationally and still kept it stored in a climate controlled facility. Today the Jeep is showing only 14,800 miles. Only 2,295 CJ-6s were built in 1967, making for a very rare Jeep. It was acquired for the Omix-Ada Jeep Collection in 2013 and has been a cornerstone of the collection ever since. It’s pristine, original condition makes it a true time capsule that people love to see close up.

The Tuxedo Park Mark IV variant added some zoot to the line, as this President Red ’65 demonstrates… albeit missing a front hubcap. This one has been fitted with a Meyer Half-Cab, which was one of the factory authorized accessory cabs in this era. They featured roll-up windows and insulations, making them a great hardtop option. A full length cab was available for the CJ-6 back in the day as well.

The Tuxedo Park Mark IV variant added some zoot to the line, as this President Red ’65 demonstrates… albeit missing a front hubcap. This one has been fitted with a Meyer Half-Cab, which was one of the factory authorized accessory cabs in this era. They featured roll-up windows and insulations, making them a great hardtop option. A full length cab was available for the CJ-6 back in the day as well.

This is what a ’66 CJ-6 looks like with few options. Of the few, however, is the V6, which was a $197.67 option in ’67. It mounts the standard 6.00-16 All-Service non-directional tires. Price didn’t opt for the powerful V6. Since everything he did order was deliberate, he must have had a reason for sticking with the four.

This is what a ’66 CJ-6 looks like with few options. Of the few, however, is the V6, which was a $197.67 option in ’67. It mounts the standard 6.00-16 All-Service non-directional tires. Price didn’t opt for the powerful V6. Since everything he did order was deliberate, he must have had a reason for sticking with the four.

Still resplendent in the original Spruce Tip Green, the ’67 also still wears it’s ambulance numbers. Incredibly, the 8.45x15 Goodyear Suburbanite tires are also 1967 vintage. Price added the GI water can on the side. This Jeep was built in April of 1967 and delivered to Price the same month. Among the special things Price ordered were front AND rear Powr-Lok limited slips. The old Powr-Lok was one of the more effective clutch type LSDs, so this Jeep had serious traction when needed.

Still resplendent in the original Spruce Tip Green, the ’67 also still wears it’s ambulance numbers. Incredibly, the 8.45x15 Goodyear Suburbanite tires are also 1967 vintage. Price added the GI water can on the side. This Jeep was built in April of 1967 and delivered to Price the same month. Among the special things Price ordered were front AND rear Powr-Lok limited slips. The old Powr-Lok was one of the more effective clutch type LSDs, so this Jeep had serious traction when needed.

At the working end was the factory drawbar and hitch, as well as a military-style pintle hitch. Price also had the dealer add some bow shackles, eyes and a trailer plug. This is also the original full-length convertible top. The Jeep has the standard-duty suspension, evidenced by the 9-leaf rear springs (270 lbs.-in. rate). Optionally, heavy duty rear springs and shocks (12-leaf, 410 lbs.-in.) was a $23.91 options. The front springs are also the stock 5-leaf (188 lbs.-in.) but 12-leaf 236 lbs.-in. springs were optional. The optional springs resulted in a brutal ride unless heavy loads were carried, so it makes sense an ambulance would use the standard rate springs.

At the working end was the factory drawbar and hitch, as well as a military-style pintle hitch. Price also had the dealer add some bow shackles, eyes and a trailer plug. This is also the original full-length convertible top. The Jeep has the standard-duty suspension, evidenced by the 9-leaf rear springs (270 lbs.-in. rate). Optionally, heavy duty rear springs and shocks (12-leaf, 410 lbs.-in.) was a $23.91 options. The front springs are also the stock 5-leaf (188 lbs.-in.) but 12-leaf 236 lbs.-in. springs were optional. The optional springs resulted in a brutal ride unless heavy loads were carried, so it makes sense an ambulance would use the standard rate springs.

With only 14,000 miles, this 134ci Jeep F-head is still almost factory fresh and bone stock. The F-head debuted as a mid-year addition for the 1950 Jeep truck and station wagon lines, soon appeared in the ’52 military MD and just a short time later in the CJ-3B. It used the same basic lower end architecture as the venerable and legendary Go-Devil flathead, but engineers moved the intake valves into a new head. The improvements in breathing unleashed 10-15 horsepower (depending on the compression ratios). F-head engines from ’64 use a spin on oil filter assembly versus the previous canister. It was still only a partial flow system however. Additions in this engine compartment include a siren, PA speaker and work light.

With only 14,000 miles, this 134ci Jeep F-head is still almost factory fresh and bone stock. The F-head debuted as a mid-year addition for the 1950 Jeep truck and station wagon lines, soon appeared in the ’52 military MD and just a short time later in the CJ-3B. It used the same basic lower end architecture as the venerable and legendary Go-Devil flathead, but engineers moved the intake valves into a new head. The improvements in breathing unleashed 10-15 horsepower (depending on the compression ratios). F-head engines from ’64 use a spin on oil filter assembly versus the previous canister. It was still only a partial flow system however. Additions in this engine compartment include a siren, PA speaker and work light.

The rear seat was ordered with the vehicle, as were the wheelhouse cushions, but the seat was not likely in place when it was used as an ambulance. It isn’t clear exactly how litters were carried. Most likely, the tailgate was down and possibly the passenger seat was tilted forward.

The rear seat was ordered with the vehicle, as were the wheelhouse cushions, but the seat was not likely in place when it was used as an ambulance. It isn’t clear exactly how litters were carried. Most likely, the tailgate was down and possibly the passenger seat was tilted forward.

The dealer installed Ramsey MX-200-R PTO winch was a good choice for a rescue type vehicle. In those days, the battery and alternator part of the electric winch equation kept then from “100-percent-reliable-in-a-crisis status,” so PTO winches were still common. The downside of PTO winches is that they were safest with two or more people working it. In most rescue scenarios, there was plenty of help on hand, so it was not an issue. The Ramsey 200 winch was a worm gear type driven off a transfer case-mounted PTO and rated for 8,000 lbs.

The dealer installed Ramsey MX-200-R PTO winch was a good choice for a rescue type vehicle. In those days, the battery and alternator part of the electric winch equation kept then from “100-percent-reliable-in-a-crisis status,” so PTO winches were still common. The downside of PTO winches is that they were safest with two or more people working it. In most rescue scenarios, there was plenty of help on hand, so it was not an issue. The Ramsey 200 winch was a worm gear type driven off a transfer case-mounted PTO and rated for 8,000 lbs.

Price equipped the CJ-6 with a Motorola police-type radio and likely a ‘60s vintage CB, both of which have been replaced by later units. Between the manual trans shifter, twin-stick Model 18 transfer case and the PTO lever, there is a forest of levers in the floor. Ambulance use was probably why Price ordered the optional 2/3- 1/3 front bench seat and three could ride up front if a litter was in back.

Price equipped the CJ-6 with a Motorola police-type radio and likely a ‘60s vintage CB, both of which have been replaced by later units. Between the manual trans shifter, twin-stick Model 18 transfer case and the PTO lever, there is a forest of levers in the floor. Ambulance use was probably why Price ordered the optional 2/3- 1/3 front bench seat and three could ride up front if a litter was in back.

The CJ-4MA shows us the first time for the 101-inch wheelbase stretch and is both an ancestor to the M-170 (MDA) and the CJ-6. It’s also the missing link between the flatfender and roundfender Jeep. A small number of prototypes were built with this front wrap prior to the final and more familiar CJ style was settled upon. Several of these early “missing link” prototypes still exist, including the civilian CJ-4 prototype and this one. Under the skin the CJ-4, CJ-4M (both 81 inch wheelbases), were very much like a CJ-3A but mounting the new F-head engine.

The CJ-4MA shows us the first time for the 101-inch wheelbase stretch and is both an ancestor to the M-170 (MDA) and the CJ-6. It’s also the missing link between the flatfender and roundfender Jeep. A small number of prototypes were built with this front wrap prior to the final and more familiar CJ style was settled upon. Several of these early “missing link” prototypes still exist, including the civilian CJ-4 prototype and this one. Under the skin the CJ-4, CJ-4M (both 81 inch wheelbases), were very much like a CJ-3A but mounting the new F-head engine.

The M-170 frontline ambulance was the military forefather of the CJ-6 and some 12,221 were built between 1953 and 1967. Bill Price’s military experience, both active and reserve, may have included exposure to the M-170 and primed his mind for the CJ-6 later on. One big difference between the M-170 and the CJ-6 is the enlarged opening on the passenger side for attending to patients and moving litters. The M-170 could carry either three litters and two crew or six seated patients and two crew.

The M-170 frontline ambulance was the military forefather of the CJ-6 and some 12,221 were built between 1953 and 1967. Bill Price’s military experience, both active and reserve, may have included exposure to the M-170 and primed his mind for the CJ-6 later on. One big difference between the M-170 and the CJ-6 is the enlarged opening on the passenger side for attending to patients and moving litters. The M-170 could carry either three litters and two crew or six seated patients and two crew.

  • Client: 1967 Jeep CJ-6
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